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Maddy Harland |
Tuesday, 1st August 2006
Who are you? Looby Macnamara. I am currently chair of the Permaculture Association (Britain). I run my own business – Spirals of Abundance – fairly trading gifts and organic cotton clothes from Nepal. I also teach permaculture and have a six year old daughter, Shanti. Hence, I lead a productive, interesting and busy life. Where do you live? I live... more
 
Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 1st December 2004
Nine years ago Simon Roberts read about electric vehicles (EVs) in Switzerland and decided he wanted to drive a zero emissions car in London and reduce his environmental impact. After negotiating miles of red tape, a reserved parking bay painted right outside his house and the development of an innovative kerbside charger, this became a genuinely... more
 
Maddy Harland |
Friday, 1st August 2003
The state of our front garden had become legendary in our neighbourhood. Our house eco-renovation had at last been completed, solar hot water was flowing in abundance during summer months, and the back garden was planted up with wildflower meadow, top and soft fruit and some veggies. We were fairly sorted. But years of work had turned our front... more
 
Maddy Harland |
Thursday, 1st May 2003
Walking near the neighbour's house, a rabbit, startled, bounds off into the pasture. I notice how the young broadleaf trees Ben planted about ten years ago are doing, many over ten feet tall. Then up the slope and into the chestnut wood, dark and still on one side, and light and open with freshly sprouting coppice stools on the other.  The path... more
 
Maddy Harland |
Tuesday, 1st October 1996
By a beautiful meander of the River Tweed in the Scottish Borders is Tweed Horizons, Centre For Sustainable Technology funded by Scottish Borders Enterprise and the Millennium Commission. The Centre, a converted monastery, is the first of its kind in Britain and was established in 1993 to support a variety of projects in the areas of environmental... more
 
Maddy Harland |
Monday, 1st January 1996
John started his journey by contacting a number of aid organisations but found that none used sustainable practises. "The Africans need practical teaching to improve their food production, not just money thrown at them by big organisations," he says. This viewpoint led him first to Katale Agricultural College in western Kenya where he got involved... more
 

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