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recent content by Maddy Harland

Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 14th June 2017

Earlier this year, I attended the Oxford Real Farming Conference (ORFC), two days of inspiration, information and practical sharing of regenerative agriculture, horticulture, food sovereignty and policy. Started as an alternative to the ‘other’ industrial ag conference run by the NFU, it is one of the best and most holistic events I have been to. After the event, I was buzzing with the calibre of the talks, the power of the network, and the generous and friendly atmosphere.

 
Maddy Harland |
Tuesday, 7th February 2017

In these times of great upheaval and moral depravity, we aspiring sons and daughters of the soil need some encouragement to navigate the veggie growing year with a well thought out plan so we don't miss out on any delicious harvests. Charles Dowding, No Dig expert and organic fruit and veg master, has provided exactly this: a week by week dairy to keep you sowing, planting and harvesting throughout the year.

 
Maddy Harland |
Monday, 30th January 2017

What does permaculture have to do with politics? The original contraction of permanent agriculture to permaculture is also the contraction of permanent culture. Having identified perennial systems (treecrops and agroforestry, for example) as vital techniques to restore ecosystems, co-orginators, Bill Mollison and David Holmgren, quickly turned their attention to the ethics of earth care, people care and limits to growth/sharing surplus.

 
Maddy Harland |
Friday, 2nd December 2016

Last February, Charles Dowding gave me some pieces of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) from one of his crowns and advised me to pot them up and plant them outside in late Spring. I have always wanted to grow yacon so I went home and did just that.

 
Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 23rd November 2016

Oca is a South American tuber with a lemony taste and pretty leaves. In warm climates Oxalis tuberosa (Oxalidaceae) is a perennial herbaceous plant and can overwinter as underground stem tubers known as uqa in Quechua. The plant is tradionally cultivated in the central and southern Andes for its tubers, which are used as a root vegetable.

In New Zealand it is known as a yam (although it isn't a true yam) and there are now a range of colours, including yellow, orange, pink, apricot, as well as the traditional red.

 

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