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recent content by Maddy Harland

Maddy Harland |
Monday, 20th November 2017

What elements of design in permaculture can be linked to agroecological practices and to what extent are they functional in terms of sustainable or regenerative farm productivity and in what context?

 
Maddy Harland |
Friday, 17th November 2017

What distinguishes permaculture from other holistic design or growing methods is that it aims to create more than a system of sustainable agriculture or organic horticulture; it uses (eco) systems thinking to explore the drivers and ideas behind more lasting, permanent cultures. Its ethics and principles can be applied to living systems (gardens, farms, woodlands, watersheds), urban and rural environments, educational projects and social systems.

 
Maddy Harland |
Thursday, 26th October 2017

Drawdown is a fascinating book and the project itself is exactly what we need in a world divided by climate change scepticism and inaction. As explained on page 56, in 2013 Paul Hawken gathered 70 scientists and policy makers from 22 countries to research climate solutions and winnow their list down to 100 of the most effective ways to reduce emissions or sequester carbon and asks the question: What would happen if these were scaled up globally? Drawdown is when greenhouse gases peak and then go down year on year.

 
Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 25th October 2017

Being a permaculture practitioner, I recently visited Sattva Land, a tropical food forest and the Maya Mountain Research Farm (MMRF), both in Belize to learn more about how permaculture design works in tropical climates. Both the projects were built on lands where conventional farming techniques had been used, causing exhausted soils, erosion and a decline in incomes.

 
Maddy Harland |
Tuesday, 10th October 2017

I am fascinated by natural springs. They are a result of surface water seeping into the Earth and filling a recharge area like a cave or aquifer (a geologic layer of porous and permeable material such as sand and gravel, limestone, or sandstone, through which water flows and is stored). When an aquifer is confined by impermeable rock layers in certain orientations, hydrostatic pressure can force water upwards through a network of cracks and fissures and the water eventually emerges at the surface. These are called artesian wells.

 

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